Trail Critters

The most avid users of our beloved mountain bike trails are actually not cyclist, they're wild animals or as I call them, trail critters.    These animals call our forrest their home and while beautiful we need to remember to keep a safe distance because some of them pack quite the punch.  This year I decided to take more pictures so I could share these all natural trail users in the act.

Eastern Newt, Photographed on the Southern Traverse trying to catch a snack!  The eastern newt spends its juvenile period in lakes and streams and is green in color as an adult they move onto land and turn this brilliant orange.   These little guys come out in the summer onto our trails and are easy to spot before the leaves fall.

Eastern Newt, Photographed on the Southern Traverse trying to catch a snack!  The eastern newt spends its juvenile period in lakes and streams and is green in color as an adult they move onto land and turn this brilliant orange.   These little guys come out in the summer onto our trails and are easy to spot before the leaves fall.

Timber Rattlesnake, Found on a rock wall in the national forrest.  these are a very venomous pit viper found in most of the eastern us.  keep your space!

Timber Rattlesnake, Found on a rock wall in the national forrest.  these are a very venomous pit viper found in most of the eastern us.  keep your space!

This is either a copper head or a timber rattlesnake found on the north fork trail in West Virginia.   When in doubt check the jaw line of a snake, the copper heads and rattle snakes have a triangular head with a pronounced transition to the body where as less dangerous imitators have a diamond shaped head with a smooth transition from head to body.

This is either a copper head or a timber rattlesnake found on the north fork trail in West Virginia.   When in doubt check the jaw line of a snake, the copper heads and rattle snakes have a triangular head with a pronounced transition to the body where as less dangerous imitators have a diamond shaped head with a smooth transition from head to body.

Black bear.  these big trail cows usually run in fear at any sign of human. but if you're quiet enough or fast enough you might get to spook on of them.  I rode up on this one cooling off in a trail side stream and didn't even see him because he was mostly submerged.  just make sure to never put yourself in a position that threatens a cub.

Black bear.  these big trail cows usually run in fear at any sign of human. but if you're quiet enough or fast enough you might get to spook on of them.  I rode up on this one cooling off in a trail side stream and didn't even see him because he was mostly submerged.  just make sure to never put yourself in a position that threatens a cub.